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Went out yesterday morning, water temps 80-85 from city park down to around hula hut.  Fished main lake on docks until traffic became unbearable around 8:30am (yea, it was constant wake action that early) then headed for coves.  Tossed under a really low hanging tree with a weighted hook orange and pink swirl tiki stick and got one that weighed in right under 4lbs.  Was a good fish and who knows, might have won me another $140 in the tourney!  ;D

Had 2 blow ups on a frog - one the fish missed and the other I tied into it and it shook me off bc of the sorry hooks on the H2O.  was about a 2lb keeper.  btw, spend the extra $5 and get the SPRO bc the H2O version is just crap.

Also, main topic of concern:  It is very likely just a coincidence, but I very rarely see dead fish in LA, but yesterday I saw a giant catfish floating (close to 4' long), what would have been a 20lb carp, and two smaller bass also dead.  I know there are thousands of fish in there, but after seeing the big bass found during the tourney on Wednesday, is there any reason I should be concerned for the health of the fish?  Clearly I am not a biologist and know next to nothing about river fish ecology.

~BE
 

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Guys, its very hot outside. Fighting fish (especially big fish) is very hard on a fish's body. There is less oxygen in the water which means they don't recover as quickly. This added with the stress can be fatal to fish. Unfortunately it happens this time of year.
 

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I have also noticed a few dead fish on the upper end and They do not seemed to be damaged by a prop just dead!!!!!!!!! Juke i believe you are right the hotter it gets the oxygen level is dropping..I think that is why on Travis the carp were on top of the water also they just couldnt seem to go down
 

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332C323C3B36216B686B69696A590 said:
Guys, its very hot outside. Fighting fish (especially big fish) is very hard on a fish's body. There is less oxygen in the water which means they don't recover as quickly. This added with the stress can be fatal to fish. Unfortunately it happens this time of year.

Yeah thats what we were talking about and thought that might be it.


Chris
 

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One would think that the temperature/oxygen depletion effect would be minimal on Lake Austin, as the water near the bottom of Mansfield Dam is still mid 50s and even down by Hula Hut mid 70s, at least, last time I was there.  Stays cold all summer due to coming from the bottom of Travis (lake that is!).  Buch and Travis definitely have high surface temps, which would impede oxygen dissolution and concentration.
 

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Exactly right RO there are still water temps on Lake Austin in the lower 70's below mansfield, the heat oxygen theory holds some logic on Buch and Travis but doesn't make much since on Austin, That mixed with the flowing, water/swirling rapids wher the water is dumping out of Travis should oxegenate Austin well
 

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RO and Ben are right, Austin would not apply in jukes theory, Travis also. While yes travis is hot(on the surface), it is also still a deep lake providing cool water with plenty of oxygen in and bellow the thermocline but there air bladders can be a problem. As for the floating fish, the amount mentioned is not a high amount to see on Austin, many fish in that lake and like humans fish dont live forever. 20 strippers on buch. floating isnt surprising either, lots of guides and regular fishermen catching them from deep water and just throwing them back without popping there bladder.A large seringe can save alot of fish this time of year. If you cant get one, another thing you can use is the metal point on a cheap rope stringer,just sharpen the point, the round shape of it allows the air to escape.
 

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While yes travis is hot(on the surface), it is also still a deep lake providing cool water with plenty of oxygen in and bellow the thermocline
Only partially true Bo-BO though it is true that the cooler water can hold more oxygen but the deeper you get the more pressure the water is under therefore reducing the dissolved oxygen level down deep. Most live bait striper/hybrid fishermen can relate to how hard it can be to keep shad alive when lowered to certain depths. All those dead fish floating on Buchanan has been concerning me. Striper obviously don't recover well I cant keep one alive in a live well more than about 5 minutes but due to access issues there aren't a lot of people fishing Buch right now, certaintly not enough to explain all the dead stripes we were seeing. The fish in Buch and Travis are in troube. We need rain and a lot of it
 

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 yes Ben pressure does help deplete dissolved oxygen, but this effect does not become deadly until extreme deeps. fish on travis long enough and deep enough and you will find that there is plenty of dissolved oxygen to at least 60 feet. I personally have caught many fish from depths deeper than fifty feet on travis and it only takes 15 to 20 feet to cause bladder problems in fish. however, i am not saying no cause for concern just an opinion, there could be something happening that we need to be concerned about. but I hope not.
 
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