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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,

I'd like to get a kayak soon and am debating between a pedal drive manual powered kayak or something like this pelican catch PWR 100 with an electric trolling motor or 2.5 gas outboard.

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I have a 4 door compact sports sedan with a roof rack, so it would have to be mounted on top of the car.

Is it feasible to have a little 2.5hp 29lb suzuki outboard attached to the back of this 9.9 ft kayak while transporting it on top of the car (from what I understand I could not lay the outboard down inside my car correct)?

Or would this be asking for issues?

Can anyone weigh in on the non-obvious benefits/cons of going with the electric trolling motor vs a small outboard like this (like some gotchas I may not think about)?

Can you still feasibly slow troll a bank with a little outboard like this?

Any info helps,

Thanks!
 

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I think if you want to run a motor, you need a bigger/ heavier duty kayak made for that. Either one you will have to register with TPWD.
 

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I like the power of gasoline. There might be more energy in a teaspoon of gasoline than in both of my marine batteries combined. But I think gas engine is the wrong choice for you. With your transport mode being a car roof top, I would suggest a pedal drive yak.

You would not be allowed to run the gas engine at Lady Bird, Pflugerville, Meadow and a host of other good yak lakes. Realistically, I can imagine it would be very difficult to load a yak with a mounted outboard onto a car by yourself.

I honestly considered buying a Catch yak before I bought the Pelican Pond Prowler. The Catch looks like a good fishing platform. But I don’t know for sure.

I saw a jon boat at Decker with a small outboard. It is very, very loud. Very, very smokey. Air cooled. He might have been trolling, but I hope he had ear plugs. Personally, I like the quiet of fishing and the sound of the wind and waves.

If you have to have power propulsion, stick to battery for now, but don’t get carried away. I saw some men bring their project battery yaks to Lake Pflugerville. These guys weighed around 280lbs and had Group 27 batteries and 55# thrust trollers. Only the very top of the yak was barely breaking the surface when they set them in the water. They went twenty feet from the ramp and turned around, hopefully back to the drawing board.

Like you, I don’t have a trailer. Because the rigged out Pond Prowler weighs around three hundred pounds, I have to “Build-a-boat” every time I launch. This requires a boat ramp. It is kind of intimidating when people are waiting to trailer launch. At my fastest, I can toss everything in the boat and float it over to the courtesy dock in about seven minutes.

I would think that you’re going to have to trade something off here. Have the sedan fitted for a trailer if you want power. If you’re committed to roof top hauling, go as light as possible and stick to one of the pedal drives.
 

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I was very VERY close in purchasing that setup.
I ended up with a Bonafide SS127 and couldn’t be happier. I like to paddle around on a fishing kayak so if your looking for the peddle version Bonafide has that as well.
Good Luck In Your Venture
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
TFTR guys, will probably go with a pedal drive, I still like the iSUP but it’s tough in the wind 😂

Jeremy that sounds like quite the workout before fishing, I’m sure you’re wide awake and ready to fish after that 🤣.

Welder, actually amazing enough this pelican is specd to take up to a 2.5 hp outboard off the transom off the back, really is a neat looking solo vessel, but I definitely want to fish LBL so a pedal kayak is probably more suitable.

Womack, that’s a sweet rig, I’ve had a couple paddle yaks in the past, loved ‘em but with lower back issues and the wind in my area, the pedal yaks are looking real nice
 

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A pedal drive kayak on a car roof rack sounds like pain in the neck.

That pelican weighs 78lbs. Add gear, some sort of wheel system and youre pushing 100lbs. Thats if youre pulling gear plus the motor or battery/trolling motor off every time. Again, sounds like a major pain in the neck.

I have a native pedal drive 10ft. All of my gear stays on it and I leave it in my truck bed, can unload and be in the water floating in minutes. I think it weighs over 150lbs loaded (probably more because I keep buying more rods and crap). I dont have the patience to take everything off the kayak including the pedal drive every time im launching and pulling. If you do, then yes its doable on the roof rack.

As @Jeremy said youre going to have a trade off somewhere. I think a trailer is your best bet and then go small jon/prowler or pedal drive kayak. A trolling motor can be added to the kayak too but I dont see the point in adding power to a pedal drive kayak. Youre just adding weight and the need to register it. Id just buy a bass boat if Im looking to go that route.

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
A pedal drive kayak on a car roof rack sounds like pain in the neck.

That pelican weighs 78lbs. Add gear, some sort of wheel system and youre pushing 100lbs. Thats if youre pulling gear plus the motor or battery/trolling motor off every time. Again, sounds like a major pain in the neck.

I have a native pedal drive 10ft. All of my gear stays on it and I leave it in my truck bed, can unload and be in the water floating in minutes. I think it weighs over 150lbs loaded (probably more because I keep buying more rods and crap). I dont have the patience to take everything off the kayak including the pedal drive every time im launching and pulling. If you do, then yes its doable on the roof rack.

As @Jeremy said youre going to have a trade off somewhere. I think a trailer is your best bet and then go small jon/prowler or pedal drive kayak. A trolling motor can be added to the kayak too but I dont see the point in adding power to a pedal drive kayak. Youre just adding weight and the need to register it. Id just buy a bass boat if Im looking to go that route.

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Ty! You seem like an above avg sized dude, is there a reason you went 10ft over 12+? I’ve had 10ft and 12ft paddle yaks (Malibu and ocean) back in cali and I always found the 12 gave me so much better tracking/speed for not much more weight (granted I primarily used them in the ocean with the occasional freshwater trip) The native pedal drive is like a propellor right (any issues with it hanging on things in the shallows?)What were some of the major factors when you chose brand/model for the pedal drive? I love the hobie outback but not sure if I want to shell out 3.5k on my first pedal drive.
 

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Bought it used so no option but I love the 10ft. Its easier to spin around and it sits in 6'4" pickup bed good with the tailgate down. Its the Titan model so it is wider than other models, so it feels much larger than 10' when I'm in it.

Length will definitely help with tracking and speed. But it depends on the hull shape as well. Since I fish town lake primarily its nice to have a smaller profile when there's lots of traffic.

Yes, native uses propeller. I'll pick up weeds if I'm careless. Takes 15 seconds to pull the prop up and free it though.

I feel the propeller is better for bass fishing because you just pedal backwards instead of flipping the release for the hobie drive to go backwards. If you fish near the bank and deal with trees and whatnot, the instant hands-free reverse is the best part about it. Old Town has the same system, maybe Jackson and others do too. TG Canoe & Kayak in San Marcos carries a lot of brands. Fishing Kayak List – TG Canoes & Kayaks

Hobie does make a great kayak but you are paying a premium for the name in some regards.
 

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The Hobie drive is amazing, but is not the best for shallow fishing. You can push the pedals all the way to fold the fins against the hull, but you will still damage the drive cam on rocks. From what I know of the Native system, you can pop a latch and fold the assembly up and into the boat for shallow areas. You may not be able to maneuver in a 360 spin, but you will also not ruin a $700 ( old style ) drive unit. Yes, you do pay a premium for a Hobie, but you get a helluva boat too.
 

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Absolutely agree on the hobie, they are sweet and much quicker with less effort than props.

My native has the boondox rudder and upgraded steering setup so it can nearly spin in its own hull length.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for all the great info guys!

I think I've narrowed it to the native slayer propel max/non max 10 or the old town sportsman PDL 106.

I really like the decked out native, it seems to have unmatched stock features, but I have read a few things about the rudder cable having issues (even snapping) so that has me a little urked. The old town quotes that their propeller drive system is the "least maintenance" on the market, and has some great stock features for a flat $2k price.

jc34 sold me on the props more with the instant reverse, that sounds like a game changer, especially with the regular wind bouts around here, they both look great and are between 2-2.5k

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Waiting on my tax return, but I will probably go with the native slayer propel 10 non max version, old town claims the sportsman PDL is 76lbs without the drive, but I have read reports from people saying it’s actually low 80s, I’m thinking 20lbs is a pretty noticeable difference especially since initially, I’ll be roof racking it, I also have a slipped disc so I’ll have to devise a system to slide it onto and off my car. I don’t plan to put the brunt of the weight on my lower back if I can avoid it, but I’m still thinking 20lbs less is going to be beneficial just in case.
 

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Have ever actually set a yak on a car? When I got my yak, my plan was to haul it directly on the roof of an Infiniti G20 sedan. Even though the paint was already scratched, my thought was to set it on two 18”X18”X4” black packing foam blocks and use long cam straps through the windows. I had not yet figured out how to secure the bow when I decided to sell the car. Our minivan came with rails when we bought it, so I had to buy cross bars. I’ve hauled it on the cross bars to New Braunsfels without bow or stern tethers. I’ve dropped the yak when trying to get it on the roof rack of the minivan by myself. I’ve also scratched the hatch near the high mount third brake light. Also, the rear hatch cannot be opened with the straps tightened.

The yak hulls are made of incredibly slick HDPE, slicker than owl poop. My yak can be incredibly difficult to get a hold of. I’ve already had to replace the crappy side handles that broke at inopportune times. I’ve also dropped it while the dolly was strapped to it and broke the dolly. What I’m driving at here is that you should trade in the sedan for a truck, if you value what strength you have left in your back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Haha, never touched owl poop but I had 2 different yaks in socal that were both roof racked, I actually think my lack of a system for putting it on and off the car possibly contributed to my current back issues, I would just toss it up and sometimes I would be awkwardly contorted while releasing my hold on it. So I’ve been researching what people do to alleviate this and there are quite a few systematic ways where you can lift the bow onto something, then push the stern up (using power from your legs instead of back) to slide it up onto the rack. One of said something’s for the bow is by turning your kayak wheels upside down and fixing it to your back windshield, another is getting a load assist for your roof rails (my car has mounts on the roof for rails and I bought the OEM ones, just need a set of cradles). I don’t fully know the system I will use yet but my back has been better since my steroid shot about 6 months ago, it aches sometimes if I’m really active or bending poorly. Truth be told I don’t fully know how it’s going to work but the way I look at it is, there’s no way it can be worse than the strain my back is getting by sitting on a board all day 🤷‍♂️. I don’t think I can ever part with my WRX it’s such a fun compact sports sedan. Although I have thought about dropping some cash for a heavily used pickup just for yaks and possibly a light jon boat or something, we’ll see.
 

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Well now, WRX! Why didn’t you say that in the first place. I was thinking you had a Corolla or Taurus. I wound up with too many vehicles in the driveway last year. I had to pick from a well-maintained high-mileage 2000 Sienna (with roof rack), a utilitarian ‘96 F-150 or a rocket-on-rails ‘96 G20. I gave the Sienna to my sister, practically gave the G20 to a neighborhood kid and kept the pick-up.

Yeah, as far as “devising a system,” I would recommend getting a second pair of hands to unload and load up. Texans are renowned for being self-sufficient, but they are equally ready to help out anyone that asks. Especially in the boating community, it seems wise that boaters would want to “pay it forward.” Some ramps are very lonesome as you know. My wife tells me I should wear one of those back supports…

My small sit-on yak does not have provisions for standing, which I would love to do to stretch my back. On calm days, I’ll tentatively stand and stretch my back. After three hours of sitting in the yak, my back is real stiff. The jon boat seat I mounted helps immensely.

When I’m loading up, I bear-hug the bow and set it on the side of the tailgate. Like you described, this is pretty awkward. I try not to grab the seat, because I don’t want to rip it out of the hull. Sometimes, I’ll wrap a couple fingers around the forward Scotty rod holder base for a not-so-great grip, and pull the yak forward as far as I can so it won’t slip back. The next step is all quads and glutes, lifting the stern as the bow plows its way up the 8’ bed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Well now, WRX! Why didn’t you say that in the first place. I was thinking you had a Corolla or Taurus. I wound up with too many vehicles in the driveway last year. I had to pick from a well-maintained high-mileage 2000 Sienna (with roof rack), a utilitarian ‘96 F-150 or a rocket-on-rails ‘96 G20. I gave the Sienna to my sister, practically gave the G20 to a neighborhood kid and kept the pick-up.

Yeah, as far as “devising a system,” I would recommend getting a second pair of hands to unload and load up. Texans are renowned for being self-sufficient, but they are equally ready to help out anyone that asks. Especially in the boating community, it seems wise that boaters would want to “pay it forward.” Some ramps are very lonesome as you know. My wife tells me I should wear one of those back supports…

My small sit-on yak does not have provisions for standing, which I would love to do to stretch my back. On calm days, I’ll tentatively stand and stretch my back. After three hours of sitting in the yak, my back is real stiff. The jon boat seat I mounted helps immensely.

When I’m loading up, I bear-hug the bow and set it on the side of the tailgate. Like you described, this is pretty awkward. I try not to grab the seat, because I don’t want to rip it out of the hull. Sometimes, I’ll wrap a couple fingers around the forward Scotty rod holder base for a not-so-great grip, and pull the yak forward as far as I can so it won’t slip back. The next step is all quads and glutes, lifting the stern as the bow plows its way up the 8’ bed.
Check out this video I found, the guy doesn't even have a special rack on his crossbars, seems pretty do-able?

 
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