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Got to the lake on Friday and fished from the bulkhead in the rain. My wife caught her first ever channel cat after one broke her line. I caught two gaspergou, a first for me.
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Saturday night, we ate a delicious dinner in Burnet at Trailblazers Grille on the square. Afterwards, we went back to the same bulkhead and caught a couple of Opelouses cats.
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Today, I caught a channel cat at first light. The sun came up a little more and I had to make a decision. I had left my fishfinder at home and I wanted to know the water temperature.
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OK, the truth. Last night, in the excitement of catching a flathead, butterfingers me dropped my needlenose pliers off the bulkhead. I found them in five FOW on my fifth dive. Water temp in the ~mid 60's...

Got back in town and needed to get a LMB fix. I got it at the C&R pond. I used one (type) lure to catch each and every fish this weekend. I used a six foot spinning rod and a 1/8oz white roadrunner with a Zoom pearl 2" curly-tail grub.
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Afterwards, we went back to the same bulkhead and caught a couple of Opelouses cats.
Are you from Louisiana?

I've often seen people call flathead catfish, appaloosa but never "opelouses." I always thought people said appaloosa because they are kind of spotted up like an appaloosa horse. But I know their is an indian tribe in LA called the Opelousa (and a town) so I was just thinking maybe that's where the unique catfish name came from? Perhaps then maybe that morphed into appaloosa catfish? Not that it matters but if you have any background information on the origin of that I'd like to know.

No matter what you call them they have the best catfish meat, especially the belly.
 

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Are you from Louisiana?

I've often seen people call flathead catfish, appaloosa but never "opelouses."..
I never heard of that neither. Have a friend from Cajuns Country called 'em yellow "Ops" (as of Opelousas catfish). Don't know if he got that name from there, though..
 

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I grew up on the trinity east of houston and have heard all of the above from different family members, half from louisiana. Ops, Opelousas, appelouses (I think this was just a speech impediment), yellas, flatties, mudcats, etc I just hear "Good eatin'"!
 

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Are you from Louisiana?
I'm not from Louisiana. I was born in a suburb of Houston also known for being the home of Gilley's and the Strawberry Festival. I was raised up within bicycling distance of Horsepen Bayou. I pronounce Bayou "Bye-you" like all good Texans.

I was shown how to fish by a Yankee farm kid from Woodstock who amazed me by catching a rat red in Galveston Bay on squid from Sylvan Beach on a chilly/rainy/windy afternoon in 1992. After that day, I started reading the "Outdoors" column in the Houston Chron and other papers. Writers like Joe Doggett, Shannon Tompkins, Mike Leggett and Doug Pike taught me the fishing vernacular I use today.

I love the colloquial fish names that mark our cultural vernacular: Bass, Speck, Ling, Dorado, Grinnel, Gaspergou, Guad, Opelouses, Sand Bass, Bream. All cool Texas fish names. I like saying "piggy perch" and "hardhead" as much as I hate catching them. I don't know the etymology of how the flathead got its Opelouses moniker.

Now that I know how good crappie are, I understand how they came to be called "sac a lait"!
 
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