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I agree with some, hydrilla in smaller lakes and ponds, is actually an issue. Depending on water clarity and stabilization, I have seen hydrilla grow down to 30 ft, been reported of some deeper. Now this was back in the 90's. Small lakes and ponds where there is no depth, meaning deep, you will have an issue, because the stuff will choke off everything. However in the following lakes where hydrilla once existed and then was eradicated the ecosystem of the lake change dramatically, either by spraying or introducing species to combat the growth. Here are some lakes

Toledo Bend - yes still a great fishery, but look at the elite tourney this year compared to the last year. There is video of them spraying, albeit they were spraying for hyacinths, but the hydrilla has almost been eradicated
Rayburn - It is still there but its decline is due to lake fluctuations, just as toledo. Right now awesome fishery though
Fayette-was loaded with hydrilla in the 90's. Plentiful fish back then, with several reports of catching, many over 8 lbs. hydrilla eradicated by spraying, explanation, getting into intake pumps
Bastrop-was loaded with hydrilla in the 90's. Plentiful fish back then, with several reports of catching, many over 8 lbs. hydrilla eradicated by spraying, explanation, getting into intake pumps
Conroe-was loaded with hydrilla multiple times and the ecosystem and fishery exploded. Hydrilla eradicated, due to property owners complaints about grass around docks
Austin-We all know this story, need I say more...thanks FOLA

Amistad/Falcon/Choke Canyon-all have had hydrilla, some more than others, but there eradication is mainly due to fluctuating lake levels

I am sure there are plenty of others that can be added. But from an anglers perspective it is pretty clear. The nuisance of hydrilla will be dependent on the size of the lake and the lake front property owners on that lake.
 

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Well said and pretty much says it all!
I agree with some, hydrilla in smaller lakes and ponds, is actually an issue. Depending on water clarity and stabilization, I have seen hydrilla grow down to 30 ft, been reported of some deeper. Now this was back in the 90's. Small lakes and ponds where there is no depth, meaning deep, you will have an issue, because the stuff will choke off everything. However in the following lakes where hydrilla once existed and then was eradicated the ecosystem of the lake change dramatically, either by spraying or introducing species to combat the growth. Here are some lakes

Toledo Bend - yes still a great fishery, but look at the elite tourney this year compared to the last year. There is video of them spraying, albeit they were spraying for hyacinths, but the hydrilla has almost been eradicated
Rayburn - It is still there but its decline is due to lake fluctuations, just as toledo. Right now awesome fishery though
Fayette-was loaded with hydrilla in the 90's. Plentiful fish back then, with several reports of catching, many over 8 lbs. hydrilla eradicated by spraying, explanation, getting into intake pumps
Bastrop-was loaded with hydrilla in the 90's. Plentiful fish back then, with several reports of catching, many over 8 lbs. hydrilla eradicated by spraying, explanation, getting into intake pumps
Conroe-was loaded with hydrilla multiple times and the ecosystem and fishery exploded. Hydrilla eradicated, due to property owners complaints about grass around docks
Austin-We all know this story, need I say more...thanks FOLA

Amistad/Falcon/Choke Canyon-all have had hydrilla, some more than others, but there eradication is mainly due to fluctuating lake levels

I am sure there are plenty of others that can be added. But from an anglers perspective it is pretty clear. The nuisance of hydrilla will be dependent on the size of the lake and the lake front property owners on that lake.
 

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Let me preface this with the fact that I am not a writer, not very eloquent, and I write just the way I speak.

Hill Country Angler when you say "Just something to think about when TPWD works to control it." I don't have a freaking clue what you mean. Show me one example of them controlling the Hydrilla anywhere. Control is the key word, and it was spoken at several public forums by many anglers, only to be ignored. Most fishermen agreed that it needed to be controlled as it was choking off parts of Lake Austin. I single out Lake Austin as it's in our back yard and we have seen the devastation that has occurred. This is quite a sore topic based on the fact that in 2013 Bass Master rated Lake Austin as the #34 bass fishery in the nation only followed up in 2014 as the #8 BASS FISHERY IN THE NATION! Then to fall out of the top 100 the following year. The demise is directly due to the stocking of the White Amur introduced by TPWD and the supposed FOLA (Friends of Lake Austin) which is more like (Fools of Lake Austin.) Now there is NO vegetation what so ever in the lake, and it is easy to see the results. Water that at times had 15-20' clarity now has less than 2'. What it took to win a tournament use to be in the 30 pound range and upwards now takes less than 10 pounds if that. Not to mention what this has done for Austin. In 2013 and 2014 it was nothing to see vehicles from other city's, and even other states at our boat ramps. People were packing up and heading to Austin to spend their time and money here, you wont see that now. Now on to something that most people haven't thought of. These White Amur have the shortest digestive tract in the Animal Kingdom. This means they eat and crap just about as fast as you read this. Wonder why the game fish look sick, (This is my opinion) maybe because they are swimming around in a toilet that needs to be flushed. I hope all the skiers, tubers, wake boarders, and surfers hear or read this and think about what they are swimming around in. Not to mention now there is no vegetation to slow down the wakes created from boats which in turn is damaging docks and bulkheads at a much quicker rate than before. Yes I'm very passionate about this, so much so that I took Sheldon Green out on a tour of our devastated lake which he did a piece on. I'm going to stop now because my blood pressure is spiking and I need to calm down.
JR

And by the way the #2,#4, and #5 fish in my signature came from Hydrilla in Lake Austin!
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
First I am not defending what has happened to lake Austin. If I am correct it is the City of Austin that had between 20k to 30k grass carp released into the lake between 2011 and 2012. This is definitely far to many for a body of water as small as Lake Austin is sitting at about 2500 acres. Those who live within the City need to look at those within the Cities Administration that played a roll in the stocking and vote them out of office.

Yes Grass carp has severely damaged lake Austin(extreme case of over stocking Grass Carp), but there is no way a 2500 acre lake sitting within the boundaries of a large metropolitan area could ever maintain a high ranking as a productive fishery. Lake Austin would have had a decline, but I agree the Decline was made far worse than it would have been without the over stocking of grass Carp.

You should also remember that those bass were there thanks to the efforts of TPWD stocking the Lake with Florida Strain Bass.
 

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What article do you have next for us?? An article that explains how predatory loans can lead to a housing market crash?

Make Lake Austin Great Again

trump-hat.jpg

Here are a few a very good article about Hydrilla and how it can actually destroy fishing if left unchecked in many lakes and specially ponds.

http://www.kerrlakeguide.com/node/486
Effects on Biotic/Abiotic Factors - All About Hydrilla
Cornell Cooperative Extension | Ecological Impacts of Hydrilla

Just something to think about when TPWD works to control it.
 

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I'm not disagreeing with your assessment HC because they have a tough job and have to account for the interests of several parties involved but for me (in a lot of ways unbiased because I am a relatively new resident of TX) I find it contradictory that their main mission statement is to protect wildlife and its habitats and then to do something so disruptive to a natural habitat as throw 30k plus invasive species in and destroy a natural habitat.

I know they were not the only ones pushing the agenda but in their position they should have been the voice of reason and ones trying to protect the habitat while coming up with a reasonable solution to the hydrilla. Everyone knew what was going to happen but they didn't? Not buying it and I think it's crazy they aren't being held accountable for the disaster they created.

Just my opinion!
 

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Since they started putting them in Lake Austin the total to date is 48,367, which is just over 30 per acre in our small 1599 acre lake. Oh and I am quite aware it was TPWD's efforts stocking Florida strain Large Mouth into our Texas lakes, I am reminded of that every year when I gladly purchase my fishing license which I have done for over 30 years. And yes I understand that lakes ebb and flow with how well they fish, but I would not be so bold as to state that there is no way it could maintain its production. Of course we will never know because it has been ruined. Another crappy fact is that Lake Austin has not had a Sharelunker submitted since 2014, just after the last batch of White Amur stocked in 2013. Lake Austin is currently tied for 5th with Falcon Lake for the number of fish submitted to the program though I don't see it staying there without some positive drastic changes. Why don't they drag the shock study boat over and lets do something that can make a difference, I would gladly volunteer to help!
JR
 

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Money talks and the grass carp swim. Now the Lake Austin folks can swim, boat, or do what ever in there cesspool. Until the carp are removed in Lake Austin nothing is going to grow in there. No telling how long those things will live or what they will start eating next to live.
 

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How ironic would it be to see the City of Austin post a no swimming warning due to increased levels of bacteria in the lake??
 

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Maybe we should have the appropriate TV news body to have some on there people test the water. Not the city. That would be the icing on the cake if you could not swim in Lake Austin because of the poop. You know that we drink that water. I would like to know that it is safe to drink.
 

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I really like the TV crew idea.
But I'm wondering if that might backfire on us. Travis is releasing water almost 24 hours a day right now and for a year or longer. So I suspect the test would end up looking good. Maybe use the TV people when the water is not flowing that much? Just thinking out loud here....
 

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Your are probably right the LCRA will more than likely with the lakes being full run water all summer. Could be something to think about later.
 
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