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Lance and I hit the water about 7am, later than we usually do. Went to our usual first stop but the shad roundup was over or didn't happen this morining. Had two shallow crank bites that jumped and threw the hook, looked like about 2 pounders.

We noticed a lot of dead fish floating. Didn't examine closely but they didn't look like bass. More like some kind of panfish.

Motored over to a stump field and the crankbait bite was definitely on there. In a short time I boated two in the 2-3lb range, a solid 4lb/10oz, and a hawglet just a bit over 7lbs. All taken on a River2Sea Cha Cha shallow diver in a shad pattern.

Lance stuck to a topwater chugger and only boated one in the 3lb category.

Motored over to the cove directly south of the parking lot and trolling around with a Strike King shad pattern size 5 hooked on to another in the 3lb range.

T'was getting hot so we called it a morning at 11:30 and hit it for Austin.

My final total was 5 fish in the neighborhood of 19lbs. For others, an okay day. But for me, a very much fun one.  :)  Here's a shot of the Seven

 

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Thanks for the report. That's a pretty nice fish there, I'm sure it was worth the trip.
 

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I just can't figure out how so many end up there each year, with temps as high as they get they should all die. I have caught many at Travis casting for bait this year, more than ever as a matter of fact. I understand that they are an invasive species and you're suppose to kill all you catch. I wonder what the real fear is with them. Guess I'll do a bit more investigation or just call Robert..... ;)

BTW nice looking Fayette fish you got there, I do love that lake but don't get to fish it much in summer and really don't know how...
 

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I always thought Tilapia thrived in warm/hotwater and died in cold water. I would have never thought they could survive a winter in Lake Travis. Just wanted to follow up on this. Anyone up on this topic? I like getting educated! :D
 

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153B0C373736580 said:
I always thought Tilapia thrived in warm/hotwater and died in cold water.  I would have never thought they could survive a winter in Lake Travis.  Just wanted to follow up on this.  Anyone up on this topic?  I like getting educated! :D
Tilapia is the common name for nearly a hundred species of cichlid fish native to Africa. Tilapia can become a problematic invasive species in new warm-water habitats but generally not in temperate climates due to their inability to survive in cool waters, generally below 60 °F.  The pure strain of the Blue Tilapia has the greatest cold tolerance and dies at 45 °F while all other species of tilapia will die at a range of 52 °F.

Back in the 80s we used to fish Lake Fairfield which was full of tilapia.  One winter they shut down the power plant for repairs and the water temp dropped down into the 50s, resulting in a huge tilapia kill.  Untold thousands of dead tilapia lined the banks all around the lake.  

I used to think tilapia could only survive Texas winters in the power plant lakes, but over the past few years I've heard reports of tilapia in other lakes like Travis.  Maybe these are a species that are more tolerant to cooler water?    
 
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