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Discussion Starter #1
My suburban is not a 4x4, so I don't always feel comfortable when I have to back up into the water when launching my boat.

I found some longer ball mounts on etrailer.com and I would like to know if anyone else uses these longer versions.
https://www.etrailer.com/question-34495.html

I've also thought about getting a Toyota Sequoia after my suburban gives out, but the rear end is a lot shorter and was wondering if the longer ball mounts would help.

Thanks for your input and advice.
Lupe
 

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Discussion Starter #2
OK, apparently no one is using these longer ball mounts.

Would anyone consider using one?
Pros? Cons?

I'd like to hear your opinions.

Thanks in advance
 

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Before I even read your second post, I was thinking, why don't you get a longer trailer.

I've never trailered a boat, but I pull stuff at work sometimes.
 

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The longer the hitch is the more lever effect you'll have from the trailer trying to push the tow vehicle. The longer one makes a lever, the less force it takes to make things on the other end move. So likely a couple inches doesn't matter much but a 2 foot long extension would be pretty scary.
 

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I pull with a Suburban and extended hitch (about 5") helps keep from jack knifing and makes tight turns easier. Been doing it for years (20+) even on shorter trailers with lwb single cab trucks. I pull a boat about 250 days a yr and no problems. Try it you might like it.
 

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Just seeing this thread...

I had to get a longer ball mount last year after repowering my Carolina Skiff with a Yammy 4-stroke which weighed 50 pounds more than my old 'rude. The extra weight at the back of the trailer made my rig unsafe at highway speeds due to the lack of sufficient tongue weight. I could have asked Spillar Round Rock to move my axle back on the trailer frame, but they had welded the upgraded axle to the frame a couple of years ago, so I decided to try moving the boat forward on the trailer. This was possible because the long flat hull sits on straight horizontal bunk boards. I just needed to slide the winch/stopper structure forward on the tongue. However, this resulted in the squared corners of my skiff contacting the rear corners of my Tundra on sharp turns.

Moving to this ball mount fixed the problem. I noticed that the longer the ball mount, the lower the weight rating. This one is nearly 16" long and still rated at 6,000 pounds which is plenty for me. I got it from etrailer.
2018-05-29_9-00-44.jpg
 
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