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Hello all, I recently decided to get into fishing. Not looking to be hardcore just another hobby to enjoy during my free time. I just moved up to Georgetown and the Dead Sea as it's been called isn't too far. I plan on fishing Lake Georgetown and Granger. I would like some tips as to what baits to start with. Which parks would be best. And lastly what kind of pole should I start with? I would like to catch crappie and bass. All I have is a fishing license. Starting from scratch. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Not sure if there is a rod and reel combo that would work for both crappie and bass but I'm open to whatever.
 

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You have a boat? It would help on Georgetown. I've had some luck across from Russell Park on soft plastics. If you are just starting out, my opinion is spinning gear. 8 pound line up to 12 pound is a good range if you have two rigs, otherwise I would stick to 12 pound. I'm in Georgetown as well so hit me up sometime. I am usually on the Colorado River in my kayak
 

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Hello all, I recently decided to get into fishing. Not looking to be hardcore just another hobby to enjoy during my free time. I just moved up to Georgetown and the Dead Sea as it's been called isn't too far. I plan on fishing Lake Georgetown and Granger. I would like some tips as to what baits to start with. Which parks would be best. And lastly what kind of pole should I start with? I would like to catch crappie and bass. All I have is a fishing license. Starting from scratch. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Not sure if there is a rod and reel combo that would work for both crappie and bass but I'm open to whatever.
I agree spinning gear is the way to go and one of those combos should be fine. A stiff light rod is what you want.
Granger is good for crappie but if you want to find them you best go with a guide.

Depending on the water flow in the N S Gabriel you can also fish in the city park.
Its difficult to do much w/o a boat. A kayak is a great way to go. I wish they'd had them when I first started and didn't want to spend much $ on the hobby.

I was here in '80 when they closed the gates to make Lake Georgetown. the first few years tons of fish were taken out. I think the lake was way overfished but you can catch some and the scenery is beautiful. I still go there but there's lots of times I go I don't even get a bump or nibble. Maybe I need to go back to the old days style of fishing with live minnows on Lk Gtn.

Have fun with it. Action will pick up as we head into Spring.
 

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If you only want one rod/reel combo I would suggest an ultralight spinning combo. Shakespeare and Zebco make a good enough combo for well under $50. Load the spool with 12 pound braid. Tie a 6 pound mono leader onto the braid, at least 3 or 4 feet long. When the leader breaks off you just replace the leader so you should never have to re-spool the braid. Mono floats and you'll get less snags than fluorocarbon, which sinks. And its cheaper.

For bait you can't beat live bait for bank fishing, but that's a pain in the ass, so most people give up a few bites for the exchange of the convenience of artificial lures. I suggest just buying a bunch of crappie jigs in all different weights and colors. You can put a piece of worm on the hook of those crappie jigs or you can buy some "crappie bites" when buying your jigs. You just put a couple of those crappie bites right on the bare hook.

For location you can google the lake of your choice and look for bottom contour maps. Fish are deep in the winter and summer but move shallow in spring and fall. They also like steep underwater walls/ledges rather than slow sandy banks. If you can find a drop off to deep water near the bank you are in a good place to wet a line. If you don't get bit you need to keep moving if you are really determined to catch fish.
 

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Just to throw in there, check out local pawn shops and don't be afraid to bargain with them. I've found some really sweet deals.

-Roy
 

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I would go with a 6'6" to 7' medium light spinning rod with 8lb test monofiliment. Don't be too brand specific and don't spend more than 60 dollars on the combo. This is your first rod and you are going to learn so much about your style of fishing in the next year. This will get the job done for both species and once you realize what style fisherman you are, you can upgrade equipment in that direction. If you have the chance this year, take a guide on one of your local lakes. It gives you a ton of confidence because you will usually catch more fish and you also learn new techniques. It might seem like a lot at first but a 4 hour trip is well worth 300 dollars if it means you will fish with more confidence. I also alternated targeted species when I first started fishing. I would fish for bass a few times (which, along with crappie, will present its difficulties at first since you are new) with artificial. Once I would start struggling, I would go to a local lake or pond with a good buddy that was filled with bluegill and catch the snot out of them with wax worms and a bobber. This was my way of getting a "win." It kept it fun. PM me if you have any other questions or need any recommendations.
 
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